Mission Statement

To engage in activities supporting educational work, which shall also include the coordination, promotion, development and maintenance of quality social studies programs at all levels of educational instruction in the State of Colorado.

Professional Development 1


13th Fire Ecology Institute for Educators-$100 Stipend available

Where:
The Nature Place
2000 Old Stage Rd.
Florissant, CO
Monday, June 16-20, 2014
coloradoplt.org
303-278-8822


Echoes and Reflections Holocaust Teacher Training

In cooperation with the ADL, the Shoah Foundation, Yad Vashem, and the Mizel Musuem....the Colorado Holocaust Educators are excited to announce a free Echoes and Reflections Holocaust teacher training on Sunday, August 10, 2014, at the Mizel Musuem, for 7th -12th grade teachers.

This Echoes and Reflections program will be facilitated by Ephraim Kaye, Director of International Seminars at The International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem.

The Echoes and Reflections program focuses on using academic standards through age-appropriate materials and teacher-tested instructional strategies.

Please email or call Todd Hennessy with the Colorado Holocaust Educators to register and / or if you have further questions.

Space is limited, and registrations have already been accepted. Hope to see you there.

Thanks,

Todd Hennessy
720-210-4374
tphennessy@hotmail.com
Colorado Holocaust Educators


Stephen ArmstrongPresident's Message from Stephen Armstrong,
National Council for the Social Studies

You Are the Advocate
For many social studies teachers working in the classroom, the statement that they should be engaged in “advocacy” for their profession sounds strange or scary. Many social studies teachers are told by their administrators not to let students know what their political positions are on local referendum issues, elections, etc., with an implication that all personal politics is to be dampened. In addition, many teachers perceive “advocacy” to be something that a few NCSS leaders might do off in Washington, DC; something with little connection to what they actually are doing in the classroom every day.

I have news for you: teachers have a constitutionally protected right to do important advocacy outside of the classroom, and it all begins at the local level. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the 30-year veteran—or the first-year teacher—talking to his or her state legislator or city/town council member on the value and importance of social studies education. With politics and budgets being as they are today, a large amount of legislative action that will directly impact social studies education is likely to take place at the local and state levels, and even national policy has its source at the grass roots.

Better than just lobbying a council member, begin by inviting him or her to speak to your classes or to help judge a Geography Bee competition. Successful advocates will tell you that building up this relationship is infinitely helpful.

Many teachers who go into a state legislator’s office for the first time fear that they won’t remember “everything that needs to be said.” Or, conversely, they are unclear just what to ask for. You may have only 10 or 15 short minutes to “make your case” (I have learned by this point to NOT take this time restriction personally). You might begin by briefly “Telling your story,” showing how social studies is important for your students. If you have a specific example of a student in your classes being positively impacted by what he or she did in your classes, tell that memorable story. Then, be prepared and ask for something specific. Don’t just ask for “more money for social studies,” rather, ask your legislator (or their aid, if the official is unavailable) to support a specific bill, initiative, or line item on a budget. Make sure you leave your card with the person you are speaking to, with assurances that you are available. Then, send a follow up note (not an email) to the person that you spoke with, thanking that person for his or her time.

Further hints: Advocate for all of the core disciplines of social studies, K-12. Since many legislators are especially interested when civics or civic education is mentioned, make sure that topic is covered. Coordinate with your local or state council leaders, and encourage others to do the same thing you are doing. Visit in groups of three or four, and rehearse your message before you arrive, and be sure you have a clearly articulated, central request.

Advocacy is not just something done by a few NCSS folks in Washington. The best advocacy is done by classroom teachers in their relationships with local and state officials. It’s never too late to begin!


Free July TPS professional development

The Teaching with Primary Sources program at University of Northern Colorado is offering three free workshops in July this year. All will be held at UNC's Loveland Center at Centerra.

The introductory one July 10 is a pre-requisite for either of the other workshops. http://www.unco.edu/tps/workshops/essentials/7_10_14.html

Special Topics Workshop Especially for
Elementary Teachers: Culture and Community
July 15 – 8:30—4:00
https://jfe.qualtrics.com/form/SV_2nK08RtZRHarzXT

Special Topics Workshop - The 1930’s: Those were the Days
July 22 -- 8:30—4:00
https://unco.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cHcTBlLFTQNUdRr&Q_JFE=0

Participants can also register for UNC credit which will require additional work online following the one day sessions.

Register at http://www.unco.edu/tps/
More information at 970-351-1555


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